Your Write to Live

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Everybody’s got a story to tell. Whether you’re recounting your real life experiences or engaging your imagination as you day dream about fictional characters, we all connect through stories. Storytelling has been around long before the written word and has been a vehicle to illustrate life lessons.

Back in the Hunter Gatherer days, a hunter may have recounted his run in with a deadly boar and lost a limb, so he would gather everyone around the camp fire and tell his story to make a point: “don’t mess with the boar or you get the horns. Now let’s make long pointy things to stab them with so we don’t have to fight bare handed.”

Yes, that’s a true story. To some degree.

Now I’m pretty sure they didn’t talk like that back in the day, but the lesson and experience is universal: mistakes were made and a committment to improvement was made to mitigate any future problems. That’s all stories really do in the end. They reveal human folly, illustrating just how flawed and fallible we are, but also celebrate our capacity to correct course.

Think of your favourite stories. What do they all have in common?

Whether you’re aware of it or not, they all feature a variety of fuck ups made by the main characters, and you got worried about them. You wanted them to achieve their goals, but something got in the way. You related to how they felt when they didn’t get what they want, thus invoking a sense of panic in you to the point where you couldn’t help but turn the page or watch the next episode to find out if they could escape a dreadful situation and come out on top.

Now think even deeper, further beyond the surface situation your favourite characters were confronted with. Think about what their goal was and what it meant to them, what it meant to those around them in their immediate world, and to the entire world at large. Was there a higher purpose to strive for? A moral principle to be uncovered? Some hidden nugget of human knowledge, new or old, that would benefit the growth humanity?


If that sounds too abstract let me give a few brief examples of how there’s so much more beneath the surface when it comes to popular stories:

The Lovely Bones by Alice Sebold is fundamentally about grieving the death of a child, as the story goes, but also serves as an allegory for Alice’s survival as a rape victim herself. She may have survived physically, but mentally, a part of herself died and was reborn into Susie Salmon, the novel’s main character.

Tarzan by Edgar Rice Burroughs is fundamentally about human adaptability. How we are much weaker we are compared to other species, but it’s our wit and human invention that allows us to conquer even the most dangerous of beasts and environments.

Me Before You by Jojo Moyes is fundamentally about self-ownership and personal choice when it comes to suicide. It may have the basic components of a romance novel; boy meets girl, boy can’t stand girl, but will later need girl. But at it’s core, it’s about the difficulties of living with a disability and the moral complications of suicide.


Now before I go on a long winded bender pointing out the deeper meanings of stories and shamelessly advertising my old BSBS Reviews (for those of you who clicked the links per title), here’s the bottom line:

Storytelling is fundamental to the human experience.

The human experience is fundamental to storytelling.

Writing and telling stories is how we validate our experiences in stylized fashion, emphasizing certain details to illustrate a point and engage each other. Stories invoke empathy, inspire action, and challenge our preconceptions of the world.

Consuming a story is basically putting yourself in a state of voluntary vulnerability in order to experience somebody else’s point of view and learn from their trials and tribulations so you can further improve the use of your own thoughts, words, and actions.

And then on the flipside you can tell your story to provide that experience for others.

It’s Our Write to Live.

My Double Life as a B/Vlogger

Greetings, fellow WordPressers, I have a confession to make. I’ve been living a double life and having done so, I have done you and myself a giant disservice. While I do value the work I do on here in terms of presenting to you inspiration for writing tips and self-knowledge, I have another passion you might not be aware of; and that’s dissecting film and literature to their philosophical core.

Coming to you from YouTube Land is Book Shelf to Big Screen Reviews! Where I review novels that get adapted for film in order to get a sense for what’s hot in our current market and seeking to understand what all these stories have to say about our current state as a species and society.

Being an aspiring author, I have the goal to educate through entertainment, injecting my stories with philosophy and universal themes such as love, kinship, personal actualization, adversity and triumph, and much much more–hopefully one day getting my novels massive appeal through film adaptations that can and will capture, if not improve on the source material.

I started this journey two years ago and shelved it for a while, but now I am back and determined to bring philosophy to the masses through my dissection of film and literature. Most reviewers will talk about how amazing plotlines and action sequences are, and I will do the same, but also so much more in addition to that. I want my reviews to uncover the veil and rip away the surface of these stories in order for others to see that there is so much more going on in stories than mere entertainment.

There is education to be found amidst all the cliffhangers that keep you at the edge of your seat and turning the page. So without further adieu here is the intro to my channel as well as the first episode ever I did a couple years back near the highest end of Twilight’s fandom–a novel that swept the world in more camps beyond Edward vs Jacob, but also good literature vs trash.

If you enjoy my content, I would appreciate if we could open a discussion on the deeper aspects of all these stories that are making it big in the mainstream and seek to understand with me why they are creating such massive appeal in the first place. On top of that, I would also appreciate if you could share these videos with the people you love and cherish who love and cherish film and literature as much, if not more, than I do.

Sure I’ll make the crass joke here and there, and maybe even praise the surface aesthetics of certain stories, but at the end of the day BSBS Reviews isn’t just about me goofing off and geeking out about what I’ve read and watch (and on occassion ranting about the ones I’ve disliked). It’s about giving film and literature their deserved attention in terms of what they all have to say about us as viewers and consumers of these stories, and driving the market toward better content.

In the upcoming days I will be starting from square one sharing my videos from the beginning up to the most recent ones, and eventually as I create more videos, share those as well here. Let’s connect. Follow me on WordPress and subscribe to my YouTube channel if you feel as I do in recognizing that there are more to stories than mere entertainment.