Delivering a Critique Burger

Isn’t that such a snobby name for a burger joint? You just picture all the customers criticizing every single bite of their burgers and saying, “meh. I’ve had better.” But it’s alright, that’s what the restaurant invites you to do in order to improve customer satisfaction!

Likewise with writing, receiving criticism can help improve one’s craft. Since writers usually expose the depths of their inner most desires and concerns within the world through the abstractions of fiction, receiving criticism may sometimes feel like it’s their entire personhood that is being criticized. Their work is an extention of themselves and so it may be hard for them to have emotional and objective distance from the glaring flaws that may be present in their work.

In order to keep a writer’s self-esteem in tact, and let them know you really are trying to help, use the Critique Burger style of delivery.

Imagine this burger represents your thoughts on a certain piece of work. The top and bottom buns are positive things you could say about a written piece, while everything in between represents the negative aspects that can be improved on. That is where the meat of criticism resides!

TOP BUN:

Since the top bun of the burger is bigger, this is where you should start off with huge compliments to help cushion the impending critique. It’s important to show that you understood what the piece was trying to convey in terms of emotional and philosophical themes.

For writers who like to write deep and meaningful stuff (such as myself), it is an absolute honour for readers to relay back to them what moral lessons they’re trying to instill their work with, or at least any subtle nuances that takes a clever mind to notice. So once you’ve begun your critique pointing out what the writer did right, you move on to the meat of the matter.

THE MEAT:

Pointing out the flaws in somebody’s work is the most juiciest and rewarding aspects of delivering criticism. When a writer opens themselves up for criticism, they must do it with the utmost humility and vulnerability–and the ones delivering the criticism must empathize with this–or the whole operation will stink. Sometimes the bearer of bad news lacks the tact to criticize effectively, the writer takes everything too personally, or a combination of both may occur, and that could lead to some sour interactions.

To increase your chances of keeping a critique session productive, keep in mind that constructive criticism comes in two forms: Conclusive Criticism and Inquisitive Criticism.

Conclusive Criticism

Conclusive Criticism comes in the form of bluntly telling the writer what may not be working out in their writing. This could be in the form of essays, poems, even memos, but since fiction is my forte, let’s focus on critiquing novels.

Every other form of writing will require criteria unique to each individual medium, but common criticisms for writing novels include:

  • Inconsistent plot points
  • Inconsistent characterization
  • Grammatical incoherence
  • Events or characters that don’t move the narrative forward
  • Verbal vomit that doesn’t serve the overall narrative
  • Scarce narrative that could use more detail
  • Pacing
  • Convoluted concepts
  • Lack of conflict
  • Lack of depth or direction
  • Lack of relatability/accessibility

…and much more. If you have some to add to this list–or a list for any other form of writing–feel free to leave a comment below!

At the meat of the matter, you’re basically given free reign to tell the writer where their story falls flat on its face so you can help them either trim the fat or fill in the gaps. Since most writing is rewriting, your criticisms (whether they’re rejected or accepted) are valuable in determining if there needs to be more or less–or a complete removal–of certain aspects in the piece.

Only by eliminating the fluff can you help a writer focus on where their story stands firmly on its feet, and gravitate towards strengthening the positive aspects you have pointed out in the top bun process.

Inquisitive Criticism

There have been times where I’ve opted for asking clarifying questions, instead of making any conclusive statements, in order to help fellow writers understand their own stories better. Inquisitive Criticism comes in the form of open ended questions that are designed to help a writer figure out the solutions to their work on their own terms.

This is my favourite method of giving and receiving criticism because who doesn’t love feeling like they’ve figured things out on their own? What gives me even greater joy is helping someone out without ever telling them what they need to do, because often times they already know somewhere deep inside, or just through Inquisitive Criticism do they figure it all out themselves.

The kinds of questions I’ve asked were in the lines of:

  • What kind of character is X supposed to be?
  • So then why did they do this instead of–?
  • Who is the character that contrasts their personality?
  • Why not put them in more scenes together?
  • What’s the importance of this scene?
  • What is your charater trying to achieve?
  • When was this particular scene foreshadowed?

BOTTOM BUN: 

Finally, at the end of your critique, you could restate the positive aspects you’ve already touched upon, or you can quickly mention a few more surface level positives. These could include word choice, notable dialogue, notable narrative points, or simply saying that you liked it as a whole. Coming full circle, this is where you can also state that if you did X, it could help embellish aspect Y of your story, and therefore Z can happen more logically.

Build Your Own Burger

Just like a real burger, people customize what they like to put in between the buns in conjunction with the meat. Likewise, you can choose between Conclusive and Inquisitive Criticism or combine them to your liking, and it will always ultimately be up to the writer whether to implement or discard your criticisms to the best of their judgement.

Understanding the the burger method of delivering criticism increases the guarantee of having your criticisms considered. Even if the writer doesn’t end up taking your advice, they will at least be given a lot to think about in the realm of possibilities.

“Constructive criticisms are merely suggestions, not commandments.”

How to apply this to your life:

Delivering a Critique Burger can immensely help you in having your opinions valued, either in a writing workshop or any other aspect in your life. This could range from personal to business relationships, and providing feedback this way will help others know that you recognize their merits, while also noting that there can be some improvements they can make so they become the best versions of themselves. Likewise, receiving criticism in this fashion will also give you an interesting and objective perspective on yourself where a variety of aspects can be considered and worked on.

Why this exercise is important:

Let’s face it, nobody’s perfect and nobody gets everything right the first time. With a little constructive criticism, we can help each other improve in many aspects in life. There is so much I could say as to why this exercise is important, but I think the ending quote of this post will be sufficient.

“We all have blind spots, but thankfully we don’t have the same ones.” – Stefan Molyneux

What are other methodologies of delivering criticism that you have found useful?

What did you think of the burger method? Do you believe that it could be helpful? If not, why not?

Whatever your thoughts are, I’m interested!

Feel free to criticize this very article if you’d like!

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4 thoughts on “Delivering a Critique Burger

  1. I love the content of your site. I’m working on developing myself as a writer, and I’ve found your posts to be intriguing. I’ve marked this site as a useful place to look when I get blocked.

    One point of feedback that I can give is that I find myself jumping around in your articles and not reading straight through even though I am interested in content. I think I have come to expect online articles to be written in a certain way, and your writing style or page design falls outside of that, making your site less readable for me.

    Here’s a study of how people look at websites:
    http://www.nngroup.com/articles/f-shaped-pattern-reading-web-content/

    Based on that study, I think 20-30% narrower columns would improve readability.

    Additionally, what the study says about putting the most important info at the beginning is important. People read for information differently than they read for enjoyment. I look for conclusions first, then look for the reasoning behind them. If you frame the overall question that your article intends to answer at the beginning and immediately provide the correct answer, then it will let me know where your going right off. It won’t spoil anything since the answer will not be obvious and will require explanation, and so will actually serve as a teaser for the rest of your article.

    Was that last paragraph that I wrote easy tor read? If you had to stop and re-read different parts of it, I would be surprised. There were two sentences that were around 30+ words. Long sentences are sometimes necessary, but keep in mind that they will cause more readers to stumble.

    I hope you find this useful. Honestly, I’ll probably keep viewing this site regardless if any of the readability points that I made are addressed or not. I just think that what you’re doing here is important, and I want you to reach as wide of an audience as you ca handle.

    • hey, Brent, thanks for taking the time to come to my page and expressing your appreciation of my content.

      I notice that a lot of people have a tough time ploughing through my articles mostly due to length. I try my best to keep paragraphs narrow, but the whole F pattern thing is interesting. I’ll be sure to check that out in further detail later.

      I appreciate the help and interest! I’ll try to implement your criticism for future posts as I always leave room for improvement.

      You also used the Critique Burger method in your post, whether you did that naturally or purposefully, that’s awesome!

  2. I love the content of your site. I’m working on developing myself as a writer, and I’ve found your posts to be intriguing. I’ve marked this site as a useful place to look when I get blocked.

    One point of feedback that I can give is that I find myself jumping around in your articles and not reading straight through even though I am interested in content. I think I have come to expect online articles to be written in a certain way, and your writing style or page design falls outside of that, making your site less readable for me.

    Here’s a study of how people look at websites:
    http://www.nngroup.com/articles/f-shaped-pattern-reading-web-content/

    Based on that study, I think 20-30% narrower columns would improve readability.

    Additionally, what the study says about putting the most important info at the beginning is important. People read for information differently than they read for enjoyment. I look for conclusions first, then look for the reasoning behind them. If you frame the overall question that your article intends to answer at the beginning and immediately provide the correct answer, then it will let me know where your going right off. It won’t spoil anything since the answer will not be obvious and will require explanation, and so will actually serve as a teaser for the rest of your article.

    Was that last paragraph that I wrote easy tor read? If you had to stop and re-read different parts of it, I would be surprised. There were two sentences that were around 30+ words. Long sentences are sometimes necessary, but keep in mind that they will cause more readers to stumble.

    I hope you find this useful. Honestly, I’ll probably keep viewing this site regardless if any of the readability points that I made are addressed or not. I just think that what you’re doing here is important, and I want you to reach as wide of an audience as you can handle.

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